Spotlight: WhiskyAnalysis.com

WhiskyAnalysis.com is a meta-analysis of online whisky reviews and ratings, to “provide an extensive comparative assessment of whiskies, based on a proper scientific meta-analysis of descriptions and scores given by whisky reviewers with extensive experience” so that you can “make sense of whisky flavors and quality, as an aid in selecting ones you might like to try next – based on your own personal preferences.”

Review: Oakkits

The aging-at-home industry appears to be picking up speed lately, with products such as Whisky Elements, Beyond Barrel Aging Masts, and even wooden bottles! They all promise more-or-less the same thing: Take under-matured or middling-quality whisky and quickly infuse them with a little extra oak flavor while also filtering out impurities and mellowing the spirit. As I discovered with my testing, the results are not so cut-and-dry.

Flaviar

Flaviar is a spirits company based in the UK, but they ship to the United States as well. While they do sell whole bottles (sometimes with hefty discounts), their primary business is “tasting packs”, which are nicely-presented boxes of five 45ml vials containing curated selections of spirits.

1776.co Whiskey Runner Flask

Let’s talk flask. I’ve always had a flask or two, detritus from various bachelor parties, 21st birthdays, and trade shows, and I can honestly say that in the decade in which I’ve been legal to drink I’ve used them maybe twice. Why is that?… These flasks make excellent gifts (although I was planning to just buy one for myself until they sent me one for free!). Oh, and the leather smells glorious.

Whisky Cocktails: The Hot Toddy

Supposedly of Scottish origin, the Hot Toddy has been a staple of drinking culture since as early as the 1750s (or earlier, the first printed reference was in 1750). Often prescribed by doctors as a cure-all, it quickly became the quintessential hot cocktail and was made with anything that came to hand when the called-for Scottish malt whisky wasn’t available: rum, bourbon, rye, applejack, brandy, pot-still Hollands gin (a malty spirit unlike today’s dry gins), etc. The original recipe called only for hot water, spirits, sugar, and nutmeg.